Tag Archives: Spanish

Mirame los Ojos…Look at My Eyes…Autism in Spanish

Hopefully you are already aware of the book my wife and I wrote last year, Look At My Eyes.  IF not…then you need to check it out.  We penned the book to discuss not only our story of dealing with navigating the autism spectrum, but to share helpful in-home exercises, words of encouragement, ways to deal with insurance issues, good Websites and I wrote portions from a father’s perspective–because there is so little out there for dads when dealing with a child with autism.

The book has been out for about 15 months and we’ve had a blast telling and selling.  We have been blessed to have caught the attention of many in the media, conference organizers and parents who are desperate to have a good resource that is a quick read and is meant to bring a message of hope and encouragement.

At our first speaking engagement an elderly lady came up to me and told me about her grandson that she was taking care of and thanked me for writing the book and spending our own time and our own money to publish the book.  She did not speak English very well…she spoke Spanish.

While she could read our book and understand what we were saying at our talk, she was more confident in her native language.  That makes sense…we see that a lot these days.  You only have to turn on the local sports station to see athletes from all over the world playing in the United States doing interviews in their tongue they are most comfortable using.  Heck, there are players who have lived/played in the U.S.A. for years and you know they speak English very well but they just want to be more confident speaking their favored language.

Autism has no language.  Autism doesn’t affect English-speaking children more than Spanish-speaking children.  Autism doesn’t care where you are from, what kind of car you drive or whether you vote red or blue.

And so it hit me…we need to have our book translated into Spanish.

I immediately started thinking how I could make that possible.  The first printing cost us a good bit of money and I doubt we’ll ever “break even” (would be nice but that’s not our goal) and we didn’t have the funds for a second book like we did for the first one.

It was high on my prayer list.  I would pray that it would be possible because there is so little in the Latino community in terms of outreach and resources for families dealing with autism.

It was really cool how it all came about.

As it turns out…my brother-in-law’s brother (follow with me here) is a licensed translator and would be living in the U.S. for a few years…he and his wife spend a lot of time in Central America and we don’t see them that often.  But he would be living only 2 hours from us for a few years and would be willing to help translate the book for a very affordable price…step one.

Step two was finding a publisher that would allow us to keep the rights, not cost quite as much as our first publisher and yet would help us distribute the book and make it available online.

A family friend of ours also has been writing a book.  He used a publisher that met all that criteria.  They were a fraction of the original publisher, they didn’t take so much money up-front (that was huge bc we didn’t have the funds) and they arm of the largest Christian publishing house, Thomas Nelson Publishing, in the world…so they have a great reputation and know how to get things done.

I was so happy to learn about these two options!  When discussing marketing and outreach with our new publisher my answer was, “well, we didn’t spend any money on outside resources with Look At My Eyes and we have been able to generate a good amount of buzz.”

But that wasn’t going to be the case with Mirame los Ojos…not only do I have not have the time to do much for the first book anymore, I certainly don’t have the time or energy to promote the second book…it’s exhausting (oh and I also run the sales and marketing division of a new home building company so yeah, I’m pretty busy)

The icing on the cake with our publisher was that–since we didn’t come out of pocket as much as I had thought/planned for Mirame los Ojos we would be able to spend a few dollars utilizing their marketing and PR arm of their operations.

And thus…Mirame los Ojos came about.

It’s been a few months since the book was officially released.  I have no idea how it’s selling…hopefully well.  We recently spoke at the Autism Society National Convention and met with a number of families, presenters, professionals and they were extremely excited to know about the Spanish version of the book.

Our PR firm started last Monday.  We had enough money to pay for about 3 months of outreach.  I can’t wait to see what’s in store for us and for both books with their knowledge, savvy and muscle behind our efforts.

We have already presented to a group of Latino families (we spoke English and it was translated) and the response was amazing!  We sold more books than we ever have for a small presentation.  You could just see how thirsty the parents and care takers were to get helpful information in their more comfortable tongue.

For Christmas this year I have asked for $$$ so I can purchase Spanish lesson software.  I speak a little French (worthless in Texas) but am dying to learn to speak Spanish.

My goal is to not to need a Spanish translator when I meet a father or speak to a group of parents…how cool would that be!

We live in Fort Worth, Texas…if you know ANY organization or group, church, whatever that would benefit from us sharing our story and message of hope in English or Spanish…please feel free to contact us for an engagement…we would love to help in any way we can.

So buy the book in English and in Spanish and tell everyone you know about them.

To read more blogs from Seth and TheFowler4Group, check out their Website (www.lookatmyeyes.com) and while you’re there, buy a copy of their book, “Look At My Eyes”.  Or find them on YouTube.  To contact TheFowler4 Group email: info@thefowler4group.com…oh and they just released their book inSPANISH as well…buy it now!

Don’t look at my son like that!

I hate “that look”…if you’re a parent (especially a father) of a special needs child…you know what I’m talking about.

This has been a busy summer for our family…a great summer for my children, getting to be with family and friends and especially cousins…they love their cousins.

My 6-year-old son with autism has really had a great summer.  He attends summer school and loves that–he’s been going to school pretty much year-round since he was the age of three…that might sound a little mean, not to give a kid a summer break, but with early intervention and solid reinforcement and ABA therapy, he’s happy and improving with his verbalization and socialization.  William loves being around his cousins and so having a few family vacations mixed into his busy summer school schedule is quite a treat for him.

This past weekend we were able to join my side of the family on an extended weekend in the Texas Hill Country to hang out on the Blanco River and all be together.  He did a fantastic job!  His cousins are mostly girls and a few years older and, together with my very strong-willed 4-year-old daughter, they keep him very involved.  It brings me great joy to see him being around his cousins because he is just one of the bunch.  He doesn’t have the typical friend relationships because he doesn’t really interact with other children.  He doesn’t sit in a corner or anything like that when other children are around–he’ll be near the action–but he’s not really part of the action.

During our vacation we took everyone to a swimming hole that was a ton of fun!  It’s in a state park where there are huge trees, river access, tubing and the all-important rope swings.

Now my son is not one to really be adventurous.  I don’t know if he’s afraid of things, maybe just a bit cautious.  This is his first year to really enjoy swimming–thanks to 6-8 months of swimming lessons–and while he’s mostly a dog paddler, it’s very freeing for me and my wife to not have him either stand on the side while everyone else is in the water, or cling onto us in the water for dear life.

So back to this rope swing…so much fun!  They had one just for children and the line was long to enjoy it.  Kids would grab it and swing into the very chilly water of the river and do it over and over and over again.

I was just happy William was in the water–it was really cold and for those of you who have seen William, he’s a string bean with very little meat on his bones to keep him warm.

I had no thoughts of William ever wanting to attempt the rope swing, but when I causally asked him, imagine my surprise when he not only said, “YES” but got out and headed right over to it.

For the next 3+ hours that’s about all he did…it was fantastic!  He would climb up the little ladder, grab the bar on the rope and hold onto it and swing into the water.  He didn’t hold on very long most of the time–so it was like he was jumping into the water–but it was a thrill to see him be a “typical child” and get so excited to be doing what all the other children were doing.

So I was pumped up!

Then came “that look” (and you thought this was just going to be a blog where I gushed praise and joy…nope)

There I was, helping him stand in line (not easy) and get a hold of the bar of the swing.  His cousins and other family members were taking pictures and just having a great time enjoying that he was having a great time.

As we were standing in line he was shivering and flapping.  He still flaps when he gets excited and he was not only really excited but he was probably really cold because the water was cold and there was a wonderful tree canopy.  So as we were standing in line shivering and flapping I noticed two younger boys staring at him and snickering to themselves.

These boys were probably 8 to 10 years old if I had to guess.  They were also enjoying the rope swing…and they were enjoying noticing that my son wasn’t typical.

Here I was, on Cloud Nine because my son was doing something daring and brave, he was having this fantastic time and I was so proud of him…and yet I was crushed.

That look…you all know what it is don’t you?  Maybe you don’t see it directly but you certainly can feel it when you’re out in public and your child is doing something that’s reserved for our Special-Ism Children.  That look.

I wanted to push those boys into the cold river water.  I wanted to get into their 8-year-old faces and give them a piece of my mind.  I wanted to defend my precious boy, whom I love and am so proud of for all the progress he’s making.  I wanted to cry, scream, fight…everything.

I did nothing.

As I stood there, William flapping and making his inaudible noises, the boys giving that look and snickering at one another about how William was behaving, I just stood there…taking it all in.

Just like that cold river water, the splash in face of cold reality just crushed me.  The reminder that my son isn’t “typical.”  That he’s not just one of the boys.  That he is going to probably stand out in many situations for the rest of his life.

So on this day of joy and gladness…it was also a time of reality and sorrow…and that sucked.

What should I have done?  What should you do when you get “that look”…what have you done in the past?  Here are a few thoughts…I’d love to hear your opinions on what I should’ve done…

1. Ignore…easier said than done but I can’t go through life with a huge chip on my shoulder about my son.  I can’t be there to defend him from those looks and snarky whispers.  So maybe we just ignore?  Ehhh…that’s hard

2. Confront…I almost did that.  I almost tapped those boys on their shoulders and gave them a piece of my mind.  Not that I would’ve really gotten onto them,but maybe I would’ve gently informed them of William’s situation and how they should be celebrating his accomplishments like the rest of us

3. Make a scene…again, would that have accomplished anything?  One of my concerns about making a bigger deal out of it was that I didn’t want to put a damper on William’s experience.  Although he doesn’t talk much and oftentimes doesn’t appear to be paying attention–I KNOW that he would’ve understood what was going on and I don’t want for him to be more and more aware that he’s not “typical”…that he’s different from others.

4. Removed ourselves from the situation…but why?  Why should my son be punished and removed from a fun situation just because others are making fun of him or commenting about his actions and behavior?  I’m glad I didn’t do that.

5. Blog about it…bingo!  That’s what happened.  SO here I am, expressing my sorrow and frustration…but was that the right thing to do?

I know I can’t be there for my son every time someone gives him “that look.”  Maybe he doesn’t care if people are looking at him like that.  Maybe he doesn’t even know they’re looking at him like that.  Maybe it’s all on me.

Whatever it was, it was an incident that still sticks in my brain.  There we were, having a great time–and we still had a great time–playing, experiencing, participating, enjoying…and yet there’s always that little reminder that our children aren’t quite the same.

Anyone have any thoughts?  Would love to hear

To read more blogs from Seth and TheFowler4Group, check out their Website (www.lookatmyeyes.com) and while you’re there, buy a copy of their book, “Look At My Eyes”.  Or find them on YouTube.  To contact TheFowler4 Group email: info@thefowler4group.com…oh and they just released their book in SPANISH as well…buy it now!